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The god Nergal had his residence at Cutha, according to numerous passages in cuneiform literature. The ancient king of Uruk, Singamil (ca. 2750 B.C.E.), was also a devoted adherent of the Nergal cult, and fostered his worship at Uruk itself.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-61143-010-3
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Publication Status: In Print

Series: Analecta Gorgiana 716
Publication Date: Aug 7,2010
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 19
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-61143-010-3
$34.00

The god Nergal, in whose praise this hymn was composed, had his residence at Cutha, according to numerous passages in the cuneiform literature. The ancient king of Uruk, Singamil (ca. 2750 B.C.E.), was also a devoted adherent of the Nergal cult, and made various improvements and additions to the temple of this god at Cutha, as well as fostering his worship at Uruk itself. This all-Sumerian hymn, whose translation has not been attempted before, describes Nergal as being ‘lord of the decree of Uruk’ (obv. 9), which means merely ‘the tutelary deity of Uruk.’ In fact, the poem states that Nergal has set a protecting net over his city (obv. 10-11, gloss), which plainly indicates the city of Uruk, and not, in this case, the shrine of Cutha. For this reason, the author thinks that this hymn dates from the period of the Uruk dynasty, perhaps from the time of Singamil himself. This hymn is peculiarly important from a historical point of view, as being a survival of a Nergal cult which was not indigenous.

The god Nergal, in whose praise this hymn was composed, had his residence at Cutha, according to numerous passages in the cuneiform literature. The ancient king of Uruk, Singamil (ca. 2750 B.C.E.), was also a devoted adherent of the Nergal cult, and made various improvements and additions to the temple of this god at Cutha, as well as fostering his worship at Uruk itself. This all-Sumerian hymn, whose translation has not been attempted before, describes Nergal as being ‘lord of the decree of Uruk’ (obv. 9), which means merely ‘the tutelary deity of Uruk.’ In fact, the poem states that Nergal has set a protecting net over his city (obv. 10-11, gloss), which plainly indicates the city of Uruk, and not, in this case, the shrine of Cutha. For this reason, the author thinks that this hymn dates from the period of the Uruk dynasty, perhaps from the time of Singamil himself. This hymn is peculiarly important from a historical point of view, as being a survival of a Nergal cult which was not indigenous.

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Contributor

J. Dyneley Prince

  • A Hymn to Nergal (page 5)