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American Journal of Ancient History (New Series 5, 2006 [2008])


Edited by T. Corey Brennan
A special book-length publication of T.R.S. Broughton, Autobiography. Edited by T. Corey Brennan (Rutgers University), with T. Alan Broughton (University of Vermont, emeritus), Ryan F. Fowler, Andrew G. Scott, and Kathleen J. Shea (Rutgers). Edition with introduction, notes, and annotated index of the unpublished autobiography of one of North America's foremost ancient historians, who lived 1900–1993. The volume contains also Broughton's unpublished 1970 lecture "Roman studies in the twentieth century", which masterfully places Lily Ross Taylor’s major works in their intellectual context.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-59333-837-4
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Publication Date: Dec 16,2008
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 335
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-59333-837-4
$110.00

The continuation of the historic American Journal of Ancient History, this volume is a special book-length publication of T.R.S. Broughton, Autobiography, edited by T. Corey Brennan (Rutgers University), with T. Alan Broughton (University of Vermont, emeritus), Ryan F. Fowler, Andrew G. Scott, and Kathleen J. Shea (Rutgers). Edition with introduction, notes, and annotated index of the unpublished autobiography of one of North America's foremost ancient historians, who lived 1900–1993. The volume contains also Broughton's unpublished 1970 lecture "Roman studies in the twentieth century", which masterfully places Lily Ross Taylor’s major works in their intellectual context.

Thomas Robert Shannon Broughton, who taught at Bryn Mawr College 1928–1965 and then at the University of North Carolina—Chapel Hill 1965–1970—is rightly regarded as one of the truly towering Romanists of the twentieth century. Written at his family’s prompting over several summers in the late 1980s, this immensely detailed autobiography of 233 MS pages—the bulk of which is a richly detailed travelogue—offers much especially on the topography, ecology and material remains of Rome’s provinces. The Autobiography also sheds remarkable light on Broughton’s formation as a scholar and person, and his experiences in the world of American and international Classics over a period of some six decades.

This material should engage the interest of any student or teacher of the ancient world, as well as individuals with a more specific interest in pioneer life in Broughton's native Ontario, or the institutional histories of (especially) the University of Toronto, Johns Hopkins, Bryn Mawr, the American Academy in Rome, the American Philological Association, and the Fédération internationale des associations des études classiques (FIEC). This special issue is volume 5 of the New Series (2006 [2008]).

The continuation of the historic American Journal of Ancient History, this volume is a special book-length publication of T.R.S. Broughton, Autobiography, edited by T. Corey Brennan (Rutgers University), with T. Alan Broughton (University of Vermont, emeritus), Ryan F. Fowler, Andrew G. Scott, and Kathleen J. Shea (Rutgers). Edition with introduction, notes, and annotated index of the unpublished autobiography of one of North America's foremost ancient historians, who lived 1900–1993. The volume contains also Broughton's unpublished 1970 lecture "Roman studies in the twentieth century", which masterfully places Lily Ross Taylor’s major works in their intellectual context.

Thomas Robert Shannon Broughton, who taught at Bryn Mawr College 1928–1965 and then at the University of North Carolina—Chapel Hill 1965–1970—is rightly regarded as one of the truly towering Romanists of the twentieth century. Written at his family’s prompting over several summers in the late 1980s, this immensely detailed autobiography of 233 MS pages—the bulk of which is a richly detailed travelogue—offers much especially on the topography, ecology and material remains of Rome’s provinces. The Autobiography also sheds remarkable light on Broughton’s formation as a scholar and person, and his experiences in the world of American and international Classics over a period of some six decades.

This material should engage the interest of any student or teacher of the ancient world, as well as individuals with a more specific interest in pioneer life in Broughton's native Ontario, or the institutional histories of (especially) the University of Toronto, Johns Hopkins, Bryn Mawr, the American Academy in Rome, the American Philological Association, and the Fédération internationale des associations des études classiques (FIEC). This special issue is volume 5 of the New Series (2006 [2008]).

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T. Brennan