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Bodily Affections produced by Religious Excitement

The article is a response to an unprinted letter concerning involuntary body movement during moments of religious frenzy. The editor relates personal experience from 1800 to 1803 and ultimately discourages this behavior.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-61143-162-9
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Publication Status: In Print
Series: Analecta Gorgiana 784
Publication Date: Aug 7,2010
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 21
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-61143-162-9
$34.00

This article is a response by the editor to a letter, neither printed nor described, related to the spiritual revivals of 1800 to 1803. Particularly, the response relates to the effects on the body from religious excitement. The editor details a particular revival in western Kentucky. Some individuals would tremble or fall down, claiming to be stricken by the truths of the Bible. From these revivals spring new sects that the editor considers heretical, such as Unitarians and Shakers. “Camp-meetings,” which are part of these excited sects by choice were part of the Presbyterian Church by necessity only. The editor proceeds with personal accounts of people being “struck down.” He relates instances where individuals exercised “the jerks” and “falling exercise.” After the list of events, the editor stops, asking cui bono? The events are long since past and Christianity has progressed much since then. The end of the article is a detailed account of “the jerks” and some reflections. He concludes that “the jerks” are not a disease but are a form of insanity that should be discouraged.

This article is a response by the editor to a letter, neither printed nor described, related to the spiritual revivals of 1800 to 1803. Particularly, the response relates to the effects on the body from religious excitement. The editor details a particular revival in western Kentucky. Some individuals would tremble or fall down, claiming to be stricken by the truths of the Bible. From these revivals spring new sects that the editor considers heretical, such as Unitarians and Shakers. “Camp-meetings,” which are part of these excited sects by choice were part of the Presbyterian Church by necessity only. The editor proceeds with personal accounts of people being “struck down.” He relates instances where individuals exercised “the jerks” and “falling exercise.” After the list of events, the editor stops, asking cui bono? The events are long since past and Christianity has progressed much since then. The end of the article is a detailed account of “the jerks” and some reflections. He concludes that “the jerks” are not a disease but are a form of insanity that should be discouraged.

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