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This work studies British policy towards the Caucasus (Georgia, Armenia and Azerbaijan) as it developed at the end of the First World War in light of the Russian Revolution.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-61719-128-2
  • *
Publication Status: In Print
Publication Date: Aug 11,2010
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 261
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-61719-128-2
$148.00

Following the Russian Revolution in 1917, the British had to reevaluate its position on the Caucasus region (Georgia, Armenia and Azerbaijan). The Caucasus had been the scene of major fighting between the Ottomans and the Russian Empire during the early years of the First World War, but the events of 1917 led to the formation of independent Caucasian states, which would ultimately be incorporated into Soviet Union. Britain, between the years 1917 and 1921, had Middle Eastern interests to protect and developed policies to meet the new demands. Kaya Tunçer Çaglayan’s study is the first work to focus on the policies of Britain during this period. Çaglayan identifies two main periods, that in which military considerations prevailed, and then that in which it was active diplomatically. The Caucasus is considered as a facet of the larger regional struggles between the nascent Turkish republic, Soviet Russia and the British Empire.

Following the Russian Revolution in 1917, the British had to reevaluate its position on the Caucasus region (Georgia, Armenia and Azerbaijan). The Caucasus had been the scene of major fighting between the Ottomans and the Russian Empire during the early years of the First World War, but the events of 1917 led to the formation of independent Caucasian states, which would ultimately be incorporated into Soviet Union. Britain, between the years 1917 and 1921, had Middle Eastern interests to protect and developed policies to meet the new demands. Kaya Tunçer Çaglayan’s study is the first work to focus on the policies of Britain during this period. Çaglayan identifies two main periods, that in which military considerations prevailed, and then that in which it was active diplomatically. The Caucasus is considered as a facet of the larger regional struggles between the nascent Turkish republic, Soviet Russia and the British Empire.

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Contributor

Kaya Tuncer Çaglayan

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS (page 6)
  • ACKNOWLEDGMENTS (page 7)
  • 1: INTRODUCTION (page 9)
  • 2. THE GREAT WAR, AND THE RUSSIAN REVOLUTION AND THE CAUCASUS (page 13)
  • 3. BRITISH FEAR OF THE TURKISH AND GERMAN MENACE (page 29)
  • 4. BRITISH COUNTER-MEASURES IN TRANSCAUCASIA (page 47)
  • 5. THE END OF THE WAR AND BRITISH POLICY IN TRANSCAUCASIA (page 87)
  • 6. THE POSTWAR PERIOD AND BRITISH POLICY IN TRANSCAUCASIA (page 137)
  • 7. BRITISH WITHDRAWAL AND BRITISH ATTEMPTS TO ALLEVIATE ITS EFFECTS (page 181)
  • 8. THE BOLSHEVIK THREAT AND THE END OF BRITISH POLICY (page 213)
  • 9. CONCLUSION (page 237)
  • BIBLIOGRAPHY (page 243)
  • INDEX (page 252)