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British Public Opinion Towards the Ottoman Empire During the Two Crises

Bosnia-Herzegovina (1908-1909) and the Balkan Wars (1912-1913)


Sevtap Demirci looks at the Bosnia-Herzegovina crisis and the Balkan Wars and how they affected British public opinion towards the Ottoman Empire just prior to WWI.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-61719-136-7
  • *
Publication Status: In Print
Publication Date: Aug 11,2010
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 66
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-61719-136-7
$110.00
Your price: $77.00

Sevtap Demirci explores British public opinion of the Ottoman Empire during its two major international crises, Bosnia-Herzegovina (1908-9) and the Balkan Wars (1912-1913). These, along with the Ottoman-Italian war in Libya, were the final events which would occur before the Ottoman Empire decided to join the Central Powers in the First World War. Together they reduced the size of the Ottoman Empire in Europe to almost nothing. Public opinion in Britain had, in the 19th century, turned negatively against the Ottoman Empire on several occasions. In this book, Demirci assesses how the two early-twentieth century crises were received in Britain. The importance of the study lies in the increasing effect of public opinion on the formation of policy in Britain. Demirci ties her findings in with the evolution of British newspapers as a means of reaching the masses, something which accelerated in the years before the crises.

Sevtap Demirci explores British public opinion of the Ottoman Empire during its two major international crises, Bosnia-Herzegovina (1908-9) and the Balkan Wars (1912-1913). These, along with the Ottoman-Italian war in Libya, were the final events which would occur before the Ottoman Empire decided to join the Central Powers in the First World War. Together they reduced the size of the Ottoman Empire in Europe to almost nothing. Public opinion in Britain had, in the 19th century, turned negatively against the Ottoman Empire on several occasions. In this book, Demirci assesses how the two early-twentieth century crises were received in Britain. The importance of the study lies in the increasing effect of public opinion on the formation of policy in Britain. Demirci ties her findings in with the evolution of British newspapers as a means of reaching the masses, something which accelerated in the years before the crises.

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Sevtap Demirci

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS (page 7)
  • PREFACE (page 9)
  • INTRODUCTION (page 13)
  • 1. THE BOSNIAN CRISIS, 1908-1909: THE ANNEXATION OF BOSNIA-HERZEGOVINA: Action Speaks Louder Than Words (page 19)
  • 2. THE BALKAN WARS, 1912-1913: PRELUDE TO THE CRISIS (page 37)
  • CONCLUSION (page 59)
  • BIBLIOGRAPHY: PRIMARY SOURCES (page 61)