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Cornelius Jansenius; and the Controversies on Grace, in the Roman Catholic Church

The author provides the biography of Cornelius Jansenius and describes his commentary, Augustinus, to explain Jansenius’s position on Grace in relation to Catholic doctrine. He concludes this history convicts the Catholic Church.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-61143-167-4
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Publication Status: In Print
Series: Analecta Gorgiana 789
Publication Date: Aug 7,2010
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 23
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-61143-167-4
$35.00
Your price: $24.50

The article deals with the Jansenian controversy over predestination in the Catholic Church. To begin, the writer recalls theologians Baius and Molina, which leads to the biography of Cornelius Jansenius. He goes to a Jesuit school but comes to dislike Jesuit instruction. He transfers, though the reasons are uncertain. The writer relates Jansenius’s academic posts and his rejection of them. His enemies plot to damage his reputation. The writer claims Jansenius was as close to Luther and Calvin as possible while still obeying Rome. The author details the papal politics surrounding Catholic sects. Despite his issues with Rome, Jansenius objects to Reformation. The writer relates how Jansenius became a bishop. Shortly before death, he ensures his commentary on St. Augustin, Augustinus, is published. The author summarizes Augustinus. Part of this is the Catechism of Christ which defines grace as internal. It concludes that will and liberty are undamaged. He directly opposes Calvinists. The author leaves this information to the reader to allow history to convict the Catholic Church.

The article deals with the Jansenian controversy over predestination in the Catholic Church. To begin, the writer recalls theologians Baius and Molina, which leads to the biography of Cornelius Jansenius. He goes to a Jesuit school but comes to dislike Jesuit instruction. He transfers, though the reasons are uncertain. The writer relates Jansenius’s academic posts and his rejection of them. His enemies plot to damage his reputation. The writer claims Jansenius was as close to Luther and Calvin as possible while still obeying Rome. The author details the papal politics surrounding Catholic sects. Despite his issues with Rome, Jansenius objects to Reformation. The writer relates how Jansenius became a bishop. Shortly before death, he ensures his commentary on St. Augustin, Augustinus, is published. The author summarizes Augustinus. Part of this is the Catechism of Christ which defines grace as internal. It concludes that will and liberty are undamaged. He directly opposes Calvinists. The author leaves this information to the reader to allow history to convict the Catholic Church.

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  • Cornelius Jansenius; and the Controversies on Grace, in the Roman Catholic Church (page 5)