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Die Chronik des Eusebius in der syrischen Überlieferung

In the present study, Paul Keseling surveys the use of the Chronicle of Eusebius in later Syriac historical works, such as the “Epitome of Syria” and the chronicles of Pseudo-Dionysius, Elias of Nisibis and Michael the Great.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-60724-918-4
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Publication Status: In Print
Series: Analecta Gorgiana 465
Publication Date: Feb 13,2010
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 69
Language: German
ISBN: 978-1-60724-918-4
$46.00
Your price: $27.60

While Eusebius is perhaps most well-known for his Ecclesiastical History, the Chronicle of Eusebius was highly influential in the Syriac tradition as evidenced by its use as a source for several later chroniclers. In the present article, which was previously published in three parts but combined here into one complete work, Paul Keseling surveys the use of excerpts of Eusebius’s Chronicle in later Syriac sources. In his study, Keseling focuses on several texts that demonstrate reliance, either directly or indirectly, upon Eusebius’s work: the so-called “Epitome of Syria,” the Chronicle of Pseudo-Dionysius of Tel-Mahre, the Chronicle of Michael the Great, the Chronography of Elias of Nisibis, and finally two anonymous Syriac chronicles found in the manuscript collection of the British Museum. In Part I of this study, Keseling provides an introduction to Eusebius’s work and a thorough discussion of the sources used in the study. In Part II, Keseling focuses on the relationships between the various historical sources used in his survey in order to reconstruct a plausible historical reconstruction of the use Eusebius’s work in the Syriac tradition.

While Eusebius is perhaps most well-known for his Ecclesiastical History, the Chronicle of Eusebius was highly influential in the Syriac tradition as evidenced by its use as a source for several later chroniclers. In the present article, which was previously published in three parts but combined here into one complete work, Paul Keseling surveys the use of excerpts of Eusebius’s Chronicle in later Syriac sources. In his study, Keseling focuses on several texts that demonstrate reliance, either directly or indirectly, upon Eusebius’s work: the so-called “Epitome of Syria,” the Chronicle of Pseudo-Dionysius of Tel-Mahre, the Chronicle of Michael the Great, the Chronography of Elias of Nisibis, and finally two anonymous Syriac chronicles found in the manuscript collection of the British Museum. In Part I of this study, Keseling provides an introduction to Eusebius’s work and a thorough discussion of the sources used in the study. In Part II, Keseling focuses on the relationships between the various historical sources used in his survey in order to reconstruct a plausible historical reconstruction of the use Eusebius’s work in the Syriac tradition.

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Paul Keseling

  • Die Chronik Des Eusebius In Der Syrischen Überlieferung (page 5)