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Early Christian artistic renderings of the traditio legis, exhibit a variety of commonalities and differences. Anton Baumstark compares various versions of the scene and finds evidence of both a Western and an Eastern version represented in multiple sources.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-60724-691-6
  • *
Publication Status: In Print
Series: Analecta Gorgiana 414
Publication Date: Dec 18,2009
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 28
Language: German
ISBN: 978-1-60724-691-6
$36.00
Your price: $25.20

The scene of Jesus granting authority within Christianity to Peter in the presence of Paul, known generally as the traditio legis, gradually became common in early Christian art. However, there are multiple variations of this scene throughout various locations in the Mediterranean world presented in different artistic mediums. Anton Baumstark discusses the similarities and differences between the variations of this scene and attempts to find continuity between the various representations along geographic lines. Baumstark begins with a detailed discussion of a miniature replication of a Syriac version of the traditio legis found in a Jacobite Bible codex. Then, Baumstark compares this version with other versions of the scene from Eastern sources, such as the description of the altar curtain in Hagia Sophia and a similar drawing in the Rabbula edition of the Gospels. Baumstark proceeds by providing many examples of the “Western” version of this scene, primarily represented in mosaics and the carvings of sarcophagi. After this extended survey of parallel versions, Baumstark concludes that there are essentially two “recensions” of the scene—one Eastern and one Western—and that while there is evidence of mutual influence between the two neither version became the standard representation.

The scene of Jesus granting authority within Christianity to Peter in the presence of Paul, known generally as the traditio legis, gradually became common in early Christian art. However, there are multiple variations of this scene throughout various locations in the Mediterranean world presented in different artistic mediums. Anton Baumstark discusses the similarities and differences between the variations of this scene and attempts to find continuity between the various representations along geographic lines. Baumstark begins with a detailed discussion of a miniature replication of a Syriac version of the traditio legis found in a Jacobite Bible codex. Then, Baumstark compares this version with other versions of the scene from Eastern sources, such as the description of the altar curtain in Hagia Sophia and a similar drawing in the Rabbula edition of the Gospels. Baumstark proceeds by providing many examples of the “Western” version of this scene, primarily represented in mosaics and the carvings of sarcophagi. After this extended survey of parallel versions, Baumstark concludes that there are essentially two “recensions” of the scene—one Eastern and one Western—and that while there is evidence of mutual influence between the two neither version became the standard representation.

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Anton Baumstark