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Horton-Smith presents a defense of the Law of Thurneysen and Havet, which describes changes in Latin vowels during the 3rd and 2nd centuries BC.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-60724-601-5
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Publication Status: In Print
Series: Analecta Gorgiana 347
Publication Date: Sep 4,2009
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 49
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-60724-601-5
$41.00
Your price: $28.70

Horton-Smith, a scholar of early Italic languages and a contributor to A Grammar of Oscan and Umbrian, presents a defense of the Law of Thurneysen and Havet. This law states that in the course of the third century B. C. among the upper classes (but not before the beginning of the second century B. C. among the lower classes), in consequence of very open pronunciation of o before u three changes occurred. First, Prim. Lat. ov- (preserving Idg. o) av-, second Prim. Lat. ov- (preserving Idg. o), av-, and finally the Prim. Lat. diphthong ou from Idg. tautosyllabic ou became the diphthong au on its way to the later u/ o. The essay presents a variety of literary evidence for this position, and indeed Horton-Smith's opinion still informs our understanding of Latin of the early Republic. Classicists and linguists will find this helpful and interesting to their understanding of Latin's development during the crucial period of increased contact with the Greek East.

Horton-Smith, a scholar of early Italic languages and a contributor to A Grammar of Oscan and Umbrian, presents a defense of the Law of Thurneysen and Havet. This law states that in the course of the third century B. C. among the upper classes (but not before the beginning of the second century B. C. among the lower classes), in consequence of very open pronunciation of o before u three changes occurred. First, Prim. Lat. ov- (preserving Idg. o) av-, second Prim. Lat. ov- (preserving Idg. o), av-, and finally the Prim. Lat. diphthong ou from Idg. tautosyllabic ou became the diphthong au on its way to the later u/ o. The essay presents a variety of literary evidence for this position, and indeed Horton-Smith's opinion still informs our understanding of Latin of the early Republic. Classicists and linguists will find this helpful and interesting to their understanding of Latin's development during the crucial period of increased contact with the Greek East.

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Contributor

Lionel Horton-Smith

  • III - ESTABLISHMENT AND EXTENSION OF THE LAW OF THURNEYSEN AND HAVET: I (page 5)
  • III - ESTABLISHMENT AND EXTENSION OF THE LAW OF THURNEYSEN AND HAVET: II (page 29)