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This volume contains an English translation and introduction to Hippolytus of Rome's Commentary on Daniel and his Chronicon. Both works are the first writings of their kind. The commentary is the earliest extant Christian commentary on a book of the Bible and the Chronicon is the first extant Christian historical work.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-4632-0658-1
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Publication Status: In Print
Publication Date: Oct 3,2017
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 311
ISBN: 978-1-4632-0658-1
$160.00
Your price: $112.00

This volume contains the earliest Christian works of commentary and history that are extant: Hippolytus of Rome’s Commentary on Daniel and his Chronicon. Both were written likely between 202–235 CE and are here translated into English for the first time by Thomas C. Schmidt, with Nick Nicholas serving as co-translator for the Chronicon.

In his Commentary on Daniel Hippolytus interprets the deeds and visions of Daniel against the backdrop of contemporary Roman persecution and eschatological expectations, thus providing much information about Christian affairs in the early third century. Throughout the commentary Hippolytus discusses his distinctive Logos theology and also mentions various liturgical practices involving baptism, anointing and the celebration of Easter. In his Chronicon, Hippolytus tallies the years of the world from creation to his present day while also devoting much time to ethnography and geography, and so draws for us a detailed landscape of the world as viewed from a Roman Christian mind. In the Chronicon and the Commentary on Daniel, Hippolytus also makes reference to the birth of Christ, which he may have placed on December 25.

Schmidt introduces both works by discussing the person of Hippolytus and explaining the complicated and contradictory theories regarding the authorship of the ‘Hippolytan Corpus.’ He argues that the principal works in the corpus likely stem from the same early third century Roman Christian community and that Hippolytus of Rome authored the Commentary on Daniel and authored or at least edited the Chronicon.

This volume contains the earliest Christian works of commentary and history that are extant: Hippolytus of Rome’s Commentary on Daniel and his Chronicon. Both were written likely between 202–235 CE and are here translated into English for the first time by Thomas C. Schmidt, with Nick Nicholas serving as co-translator for the Chronicon.

In his Commentary on Daniel Hippolytus interprets the deeds and visions of Daniel against the backdrop of contemporary Roman persecution and eschatological expectations, thus providing much information about Christian affairs in the early third century. Throughout the commentary Hippolytus discusses his distinctive Logos theology and also mentions various liturgical practices involving baptism, anointing and the celebration of Easter. In his Chronicon, Hippolytus tallies the years of the world from creation to his present day while also devoting much time to ethnography and geography, and so draws for us a detailed landscape of the world as viewed from a Roman Christian mind. In the Chronicon and the Commentary on Daniel, Hippolytus also makes reference to the birth of Christ, which he may have placed on December 25.

Schmidt introduces both works by discussing the person of Hippolytus and explaining the complicated and contradictory theories regarding the authorship of the ‘Hippolytan Corpus.’ He argues that the principal works in the corpus likely stem from the same early third century Roman Christian community and that Hippolytus of Rome authored the Commentary on Daniel and authored or at least edited the Chronicon.

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ContributorBiography

Nick Nicholas

T. Schmidt

T. C. Schmidt (Yale PhD) is the Assistant Professor of New Testament and Early Christianity at Fairfield University. He has broad interests that touch upon the historical Jesus, the formation of the New Testament, patristic eschatological thought, and the history of Christianity in Syriac and Arabic contexts. He has published the following volumes: Hippolytus of Rome: Commentary on Daniel and ‘Chronicon’ (Gorgias, 2017); Revelation 1-3 in Christian Arabic Commentary (Fordham, 2019, with Stephen Davis and Shawqi Talia); Revelation and its Eastern Commentators: Making the New Testament in the Early Christian World (Cambridge, 2021); Isho’dad of Merv: Commentary on Daniel (Gorgias, 2022); Cassiodorus, St. Gregory the Great, and Anonymous Greek Scholia: Writings on the Apocalypse (CUA, 2022, with Francis X. Gumerlock and Mark DelCogliano). He is currently preparing a monograph for Oxford University Press on the ancient Jewish historian Josephus and his description of Jesus.

Table of Contents (v)

Acknowledgments (vii)

Introduction to the Commentary on Daniel and the ‘Chronicon’ of Hippolytus (1)

Authorship of the Hippolytan Corpus (2)

The Life of Hippolytus (8)

Themes in Hippolytus’s Commentary on Daniel (14)

Persecution (15)

Eschatology (16)

Typology (18)

The Life of the Church and Logos Theology (20)

Reception (22)

The ‘Chronicon’ (23)

The Composition of the ‘Chronicon’ (26)

Chronological Contradictions in the Hippolytan Corpus (29)

The Complementary Nature of the ‘Chronicon’ and the Commentary on Daniel (31)

Reception of the ‘Chronicon’ (32)

Text of the Commentary on Daniel (35)

Key (36)

Text of the ‘Chronicon’ (191)

Key (194)

For lines 240–613 (Periplus) (195)

Bibliography (289)

Index to the Commentary on Daniel (297)

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