You have no items in your shopping cart.
Search
Filters

Humanity’s Sin in Paradise


Ephrem, Jacob of Sarug, and Narsai in Conversation


Van Rompay discusses Jacob of Sarug’s understanding of sin by interweaving a conversation with 4th-century Ephrem’s influence and Jacob's late 5th-century contemporary thinker, Narsai. Critical to this discussion is their assumption of Adam’s created capacities.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-4632-0098-5
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Series: Analecta Gorgiana 1050
Publication Date: Dec 14,2011
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 23
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-4632-0098-5
$35.00

Van Rompay discusses Jacob of Sarug’s concept of sin by interweaving a conversation with 4th century Ephrem’s influence and Jacob’s late 5th century contemporary thinker, Narsai. Critical to this discussion is their assumption of Adam’s created capacity of mind and will. Juxtaposed, the audience may better understand Jacob of Sarug in his theological context. For Ephrem, free will required temptation as a precondition, and the forbidden fruit was a test of human potential. Both Ephrem and Jacob reasoned that Adam had full intellectual capacity and the test, God’s commandment, was made in order for man to fulfill his role as God’s image. Jacob of Sarug added that Adam might not have been expelled for his disobedience, but for his state of immortality. Narsai argued that Adam was created as a mortal, and God intended for Adam to experience a learning process.

Van Rompay discusses Jacob of Sarug’s concept of sin by interweaving a conversation with 4th century Ephrem’s influence and Jacob’s late 5th century contemporary thinker, Narsai. Critical to this discussion is their assumption of Adam’s created capacity of mind and will. Juxtaposed, the audience may better understand Jacob of Sarug in his theological context. For Ephrem, free will required temptation as a precondition, and the forbidden fruit was a test of human potential. Both Ephrem and Jacob reasoned that Adam had full intellectual capacity and the test, God’s commandment, was made in order for man to fulfill his role as God’s image. Jacob of Sarug added that Adam might not have been expelled for his disobedience, but for his state of immortality. Narsai argued that Adam was created as a mortal, and God intended for Adam to experience a learning process.

Write your own review
  • Only registered users can write reviews
  • Bad
  • Excellent
Contributor

Lucas Van Rompay

  • Ephrem's View of Human Potential and Sin (page 6)
  • Jacob of Sarug in Ephrem's Footsteps (page 9)
  • Was Adam created mortal or immortal? (page 10)
  • Jacob and Narsai: Communalities and Separation (page 12)
  • Pedagogy, Freewill, and Human Responsibility (page 19)
  • The School of Edessa: A Shared Legacy (page 22)
Customers who bought this item also bought

The New Syriac Primer, 2nd Edition

Series: Gorgias Handbooks 9
ISBN: 978-1-59333-325-6
A truly useful introduction to the Syriac language is a rare find. This practical initiation to the study of this ancient language of the Christian church speaks with clarity and authority. A fruitful integration of scholarly introduction and practical application, this primer is more than a simple grammar or syntactic introduction to the language. Writing in a style designed for beginners, Kiraz avoids technical language and strives for a reader-friendly inductive approach. Readings from actual Syriac texts allow the student to experience the language first hand and the basics of the grammar of the language are ably explained. The book comes with downloadable material so that readers may listen to all reading sentences and text passages in the book.
$48.00

The Syriac Dot

A Short History
ISBN: 978-1-4632-0425-9
The dot is used for everything in Syriac from tense to gender, number, and pronunciation, and unsurprisingly represents one of the biggest obstacles to learning the language. Using inscriptions, early grammars, and experiments with modern scribes, Dr. Kiraz peels back the evolution of the dot layer by layer to explain each of its uses in detail and to show how it adopted the wide range of uses it has today.
$42.00

Isaac the Syrian's Spiritual Works

Edited and Translated by Mary T. Hansbury
ISBN: 978-1-4632-0593-5
Isaac the Syrian lived the solitary life in the 7th century. He was born in Qatar and subsequently lived in present day Iraq and Iran. After life as a monk, then briefly as a bishop, he withdrew to live the solitary life. These discourses are primarily for solitaries to consolidate them in the love and mercy of God. In this volume, the text of Isaac V has also been included because of the light which it sheds on Apocatastasis, of increasing interest in academic and ecclesial circles.
$90.00

The Center and the Source

Second Century Incarnational Christology and Early Catholic Christianity
ISBN: 978-1-4632-0646-8
This book proposes a model for explaining unity and diversity in early Christianity that centers about a clear confessional identity, allowing both extreme expressions of diversity of texts and traditions while explaining the exclusion of teachers, texts, and traditions that deviated from the confessional norm.
$203.00