Close
You have no items in your shopping cart.
Search
Filters

Jewish Cultural Elements in the Ethiopian Orthodox Täwaḥədo Church


This monograph traces how ‘Jewish’ elements were introduced into and disseminated throughout the Ethiopian Orthodox Täwaḥədo Church through a series of multi-layered, socio-politico-cultural processes. Drawing on historical and literary evidence, Afework tracks the incorporation of Jewish features into the Ethiopian Orthodox Church from pre-Aksumite Christianity, before the fourth century, through the sixteenth century.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-4632-0717-5
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Publication Date: Jul 30,2020
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 369
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-4632-0717-5
$118.00
$94.40
x =

This book investigates the formation of the Jewish cultural profile of the Ethiopian Orthodox Täwaḥədo Church (EOTC), arguing that it was formed after the sixth century CE through gradual and complex socio-politico-cultural processes, which spanned many centuries. To this end, it employs historical and literary evidence to (re)examine the religious profile of the pre- and post- fourth century CE Aksumite kingdom, and probes the robust cultural developments of the empire in the sixth century in order to highlight the existence of a ‘Jewish/Judaeo-Christian’ identity. Aksum’s relationship with Jews across the Red Sea and its potential impact on the later development of Ethiopia’s Jewish culture is examined, particularly during the Zagʷe era, for which scant but important historical evidence is provided.

Afework demonstrates that the impact of indigenous culture, coupled with the steady growth of a ‘Judaic’ heritage of the church, beginning in the sixth century, was accompanied by the emergence of an ‘Israelite’ and ‘Solomonic’ ethos. The translation of some of the works of ‘Church Fathers’ in and after the fourteenth century further augmented this impact. The Jewish cultural heritage, particularly, was fully developed and shaped during the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, as is epitomised by the series of debates about the place of Sabbath and the further theologising and contextualising efforts regarding the ‘Judaic’ elements of the EOTC.

This book investigates the formation of the Jewish cultural profile of the Ethiopian Orthodox Täwaḥədo Church (EOTC), arguing that it was formed after the sixth century CE through gradual and complex socio-politico-cultural processes, which spanned many centuries. To this end, it employs historical and literary evidence to (re)examine the religious profile of the pre- and post- fourth century CE Aksumite kingdom, and probes the robust cultural developments of the empire in the sixth century in order to highlight the existence of a ‘Jewish/Judaeo-Christian’ identity. Aksum’s relationship with Jews across the Red Sea and its potential impact on the later development of Ethiopia’s Jewish culture is examined, particularly during the Zagʷe era, for which scant but important historical evidence is provided.

Afework demonstrates that the impact of indigenous culture, coupled with the steady growth of a ‘Judaic’ heritage of the church, beginning in the sixth century, was accompanied by the emergence of an ‘Israelite’ and ‘Solomonic’ ethos. The translation of some of the works of ‘Church Fathers’ in and after the fourteenth century further augmented this impact. The Jewish cultural heritage, particularly, was fully developed and shaped during the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, as is epitomised by the series of debates about the place of Sabbath and the further theologising and contextualising efforts regarding the ‘Judaic’ elements of the EOTC.

Write your own review
  • Only registered users can write reviews
  • Bad
  • Excellent
Contributor Biography

Afework Hailu

Afework Hailu Beyene completed his PhD at the School of Oriental and African Studies (University of London). Prior to that, he studied at the Ethiopian Graduate School of Theology (EGST) and the Institute of Ethiopian Studies (Addis Ababa University). Currently he is a lecturer in History of Christianity at EGST.

 

Customers who bought this item also bought

Chinese Heirs to Muhammad

Writing Islamic History in Early Modern China
ISBN: 978-1-4632-3925-1
How was the past imagined by Hui Muslims in late nineteenth and early twentieth century China? Chen argues that this was a productive time for historical thought, bookended by the establishment of a robust Sino-Islamic knowledge base by Liu Zhi on one end and Republican China on the other end. This book explores histories that unify vast stretches of time and place: from genesis to the modern era, from Arabia to China. Hui historians create narratives that transform China into an Islamic space and Islam into a Chinese religion.
$80.46

Through the Prism of Wisdom

Elijah the Prophet as a Bearer of Wisdom in Rabbinic Literature
Series: Judaism in Context 23
ISBN: 978-1-4632-0742-7
This monograph explores the nature of the Elijah traditions in rabbinic literature and their connection to the wisdom tradition. By examining the diverse Elijah traditions in connection to the wisdom and apocalyptic traditions, Alouf-Aboody sheds new light on the manner in which Elijah’s role developed in rabbinic literature.
$142.40

The History of John the Son of Zebedee

Introduction, Texts and Translations
ISBN: 978-1-4632-4075-2
Many stories and legends about John the son of Zebedee have survived from antiquity. He was known as one of the twelve disciples of Jesus Christ, as the “Beloved Disciple” and author of the Gospel of John, and even as the recipient of the divine revelation in the Apocalypse. Later traditions, such as the Greek Acts of John, told of how John traveled to Ephesus and converted people to Christianity. John was an important figure to Catholic Christians, to Gnostic Christians, and to Manichaeans. He also found a distinct place among Syriac Christians who preserved their own story about John’s acts in Ephesus. William Wright first introduced the History of John in 1871 using two manuscript witnesses. Since then, more witnesses have been discovered, but little work has been done on this native Syriac apocryphon. The present volume brings together all of the known Syriac witnesses to the History of John with a new translation and includes, for the first time, a critical discussion of the history, provenance, and importance of this text for the study of Syriac Christianity and Christian Apocrypha more generally.
$91.96

The Last Empire of Iran

ISBN: 978-1-4632-0616-1
As part of the Gorgias Handbook Series, this book provides a political and military history of the Sasanian Empire in Late Antiquity (220s to 651 CE). The book takes the form of a narrative, which situates Sasanian Iran as a continental power between Rome and the world of the steppe nomad.
$63.00