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The author’s intent is to continue a search about the origins of the Phoenician alphabet and whether it has a connection to old Babylonian and Egyptian. Up until this point, no satisfactory connection has been made to the Babylonian syllabaries.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-61143-146-9
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Publication Status: In Print
Series: Analecta Gorgiana 768
Publication Date: Aug 7,2010
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 26
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-61143-146-9
$35.00
Your price: $24.50

In 1883 John Peters presented a paper on “The Egyptian and Old Babylonian Theories of the Origin of the Phoenician Alphabet Compared”, in which he argued for the Babylonian origin on the ground principally of the names of the letters. The author plans on continuing this search, but now with knowledge found from recent discoveries. Other systems of writing besides the Babylonian and Egyptian scripts were in existence among peoples in contact with Phoenicia in the second half of the second millennium B.C.E. The earliest Phoenician inscription found is known as the Baal Lebanon inscription, which was supposed to have been dedicated by different donors in the temple of Baal in the ninth or tenth century B.C.E. No satisfactory connection has been made to the Babylonian syllabaries. Scholars must wait for further light through the discovery of intermediary facts.

In 1883 John Peters presented a paper on “The Egyptian and Old Babylonian Theories of the Origin of the Phoenician Alphabet Compared”, in which he argued for the Babylonian origin on the ground principally of the names of the letters. The author plans on continuing this search, but now with knowledge found from recent discoveries. Other systems of writing besides the Babylonian and Egyptian scripts were in existence among peoples in contact with Phoenicia in the second half of the second millennium B.C.E. The earliest Phoenician inscription found is known as the Baal Lebanon inscription, which was supposed to have been dedicated by different donors in the temple of Baal in the ninth or tenth century B.C.E. No satisfactory connection has been made to the Babylonian syllabaries. Scholars must wait for further light through the discovery of intermediary facts.

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Contributor

John Peters

  • Notes on Recent Theories of the Origin of the Alphabet (page 5)