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Jastrow addresses how the final codification of the laws of Hammurapi evolved and which process the Babylonians used to get there. The Code of Hammurapi was subject to constant adjustments, providing that conditions constantly changed and new situations arose.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-61719-036-0
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Series: Analecta Gorgiana 521
Publication Date: Apr 30,2010
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 37
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-61719-036-0
$38.00

The Code of Hammurapi is one of the greatest collections of ancient laws. However, scholars are not sure as to which process the Babylonians used which led to the final codification of the laws. Certain conditions had to be considered in amassing a large work, such as advancing social conditions and modifying of established practices in order to adapt them without the abandonment of the underlying principles to later conditions. Morris Jastrow believes that it is possible to distinguish within the code between older laws carried over from an earlier period and additions in the form of new laws based on the same ancient principles and judicial decisions for special circumstances. Law is steadily progressive; it grows by accumulations, representing established practice and decisions rendered as new circumstances arise, and it’s of the nature of this process that the old is carried over into the new. The code no doubt formed a norm and standard for future days, but insofar as conditions were constantly changing and new situations arose, the code was subject to constant modifications.

The Code of Hammurapi is one of the greatest collections of ancient laws. However, scholars are not sure as to which process the Babylonians used which led to the final codification of the laws. Certain conditions had to be considered in amassing a large work, such as advancing social conditions and modifying of established practices in order to adapt them without the abandonment of the underlying principles to later conditions. Morris Jastrow believes that it is possible to distinguish within the code between older laws carried over from an earlier period and additions in the form of new laws based on the same ancient principles and judicial decisions for special circumstances. Law is steadily progressive; it grows by accumulations, representing established practice and decisions rendered as new circumstances arise, and it’s of the nature of this process that the old is carried over into the new. The code no doubt formed a norm and standard for future days, but insofar as conditions were constantly changing and new situations arose, the code was subject to constant modifications.

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Contributor

Morris Jastrow

  • Older and Later Elements in the Code of Hammurapi (page 5)