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Pastoral Politics


Animals, Agriculture and Society in Ancient Greece


Written by a historian with a specialization in animal husbandry, this monograph provides an essential, practical aspect of historical study to a field that generally overlooks such mundane matters. Howe addresses the basic issues of why Classical Greece would have chosen to dedicate land that would have otherwise been useful for food-plant cultivation to the raising of domestic livestock. Sure to bring new light on an area often simply accepted as a way of life in the ancient world, this study provides an entryway into Classical thought about a necessity of ancient life.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 1-930053-54-1
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Publication Date: Nov 10,2008
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 0
Language: English
ISBN: 1-930053-54-1
$30.00

Written by a historian with a specialization in animal husbandry, this monograph provides an essential, practical aspect of historical study to a field that generally overlooks such mundane matters. Howe addresses the basic issues of why Classical Greece would have chosen to dedicate land that would have otherwise been useful for food-plant cultivation to the raising of domestic livestock. Rich land that would have benefited cereal production was offered over to the grazing of non-food animals such as horses, and this presents obvious historical questions. Howe also addresses how livestock raising affected those who were not directly involved in such practices, including their choices about animal consumption and animal production in general. The study begins with a consideration of pastoral politics and the viewpoint of animals as a sign of wealth. The practical issues of animal management strategies and animal husbandry interplay with the use of animals for way and for displays of power. Sure to bring new light on an area often simply accepted as a way of life in the ancient world, this study provides an entryway into Classical thought about a necessity of ancient life.

Written by a historian with a specialization in animal husbandry, this monograph provides an essential, practical aspect of historical study to a field that generally overlooks such mundane matters. Howe addresses the basic issues of why Classical Greece would have chosen to dedicate land that would have otherwise been useful for food-plant cultivation to the raising of domestic livestock. Rich land that would have benefited cereal production was offered over to the grazing of non-food animals such as horses, and this presents obvious historical questions. Howe also addresses how livestock raising affected those who were not directly involved in such practices, including their choices about animal consumption and animal production in general. The study begins with a consideration of pastoral politics and the viewpoint of animals as a sign of wealth. The practical issues of animal management strategies and animal husbandry interplay with the use of animals for way and for displays of power. Sure to bring new light on an area often simply accepted as a way of life in the ancient world, this study provides an entryway into Classical thought about a necessity of ancient life.

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Contributor

Timothy Howe