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Quakerism not Christianity

Or Reasons for renouncing the doctrine of Friends. In three parts. By Samuel Hanson Cox, D.D., Pastor of the Laight Street Presbyterian Church; and for twenty years a member of the Society of Friends. Pp. 686.


The article reviews a book which is highly critical of Quakerism. The reviewer relates a brief history of Quakerism and proceeds to challenge Quaker doctrines. Quakerism is described as an incorrect form of Christianity.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-61143-188-9
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Publication Status: In Print
Series: Analecta Gorgiana 810
Publication Date: Aug 5,2010
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 27
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-61143-188-9
$36.00
Your price: $25.20

This article reviews a ponderous, “unique,” and “amusing” book on Quakerism by Dr. Samuel Hanson Cox. The author considers Quakerism heretical. The reviewer says the book is “highly instructive,” able to clarify complexities of Quakerism through a combination of Scripture and logic. The book is severe and sarcastic, sometimes inappropriately, but it honestly strives to do good. Following initial comments, the reviewer recaps the origin of Quakerism in the early 17th century as well as its persecution. The reviewer describes three prominent Quakers: Fox, Barclay, and Penn. Following a description of the Quaker sects is a description of the “inward light” doctrine and a number of Quaker views. The Friends (Quakers) are “distinguished by exemplary morality,” but their system is “at best an adulterated kind of Christianity.” The religion is unfriendly to intellectualism and promotes enthusiasm. The reviewer believes Quakerism supports self-righteousness and does not preach true moral principles.

This article reviews a ponderous, “unique,” and “amusing” book on Quakerism by Dr. Samuel Hanson Cox. The author considers Quakerism heretical. The reviewer says the book is “highly instructive,” able to clarify complexities of Quakerism through a combination of Scripture and logic. The book is severe and sarcastic, sometimes inappropriately, but it honestly strives to do good. Following initial comments, the reviewer recaps the origin of Quakerism in the early 17th century as well as its persecution. The reviewer describes three prominent Quakers: Fox, Barclay, and Penn. Following a description of the Quaker sects is a description of the “inward light” doctrine and a number of Quaker views. The Friends (Quakers) are “distinguished by exemplary morality,” but their system is “at best an adulterated kind of Christianity.” The religion is unfriendly to intellectualism and promotes enthusiasm. The reviewer believes Quakerism supports self-righteousness and does not preach true moral principles.

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