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Šalmūtā Šapīrtā

Festschrift for Rifaat Y. Ebied in honour of his contributions to Semitic Studies


A Festschrift for Rifaat Ebied celebrating a lifetime of work in the field of Semitic Studies, in particular Syriac, Christian Arabic, and Mandaic.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-4632-4541-2
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Publication Status: In Print
Publication Date: May 31,2023
Interior Color: Black with Color Inserts
Trim Size: 7 x 10
Page Count: 431
Languages: English
ISBN: 978-1-4632-4541-2
$140.00
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Šalmūtā Šapīrtā “the/a Perfect Harmony” is a collection of papers dedicated to Prof. Rifaat Ebied in recognition of his seminal contributions to Semitic Studies. The broad range of topics, covering Christian-Muslim relations, Biblical studies (Old and New Testament), Syriac, Mandaic and the Christians of Iraq reflects his input either by way of scholarly publications or by his supervision of doctoral students and opening of new fields. Syriac studies are especially represented; with papers on the language of Peter of Kallinikos, the works of Daniel of Salah and Daniel of Mardin, as well as poems purportedly attributed to Ephrem. Papers on the monastic traditions in the East Syriac tradition discuss the authorship of The Book of Steps and the transfer of the Mesopotamian tradition to Turfan. A unique mosaic from Edessa and 19th century Syrian Orthodox patriarchal inscriptions illustrate art and epigraphy in the West Syriac tradition, while theological interpretation, both textual and visual, are the subject of papers on Timothy Aerelius and the iconography of Western and Oriental churches. Bible studies interrogate questions about the Peshitta’s authorship, also the Old Greek versions of Daniel. A new translation of Al-Qāsim ibn Ibrāhīm al-Rassī throws light on Christian-Muslim relations in the 9th century. Turning to modern times, several papers discuss the Christian communities of Iraq, as well as in-depth studies on Mandaic theology and ritual.

Šalmūtā Šapīrtā “the/a Perfect Harmony” is a collection of papers dedicated to Prof. Rifaat Ebied in recognition of his seminal contributions to Semitic Studies. The broad range of topics, covering Christian-Muslim relations, Biblical studies (Old and New Testament), Syriac, Mandaic and the Christians of Iraq reflects his input either by way of scholarly publications or by his supervision of doctoral students and opening of new fields. Syriac studies are especially represented; with papers on the language of Peter of Kallinikos, the works of Daniel of Salah and Daniel of Mardin, as well as poems purportedly attributed to Ephrem. Papers on the monastic traditions in the East Syriac tradition discuss the authorship of The Book of Steps and the transfer of the Mesopotamian tradition to Turfan. A unique mosaic from Edessa and 19th century Syrian Orthodox patriarchal inscriptions illustrate art and epigraphy in the West Syriac tradition, while theological interpretation, both textual and visual, are the subject of papers on Timothy Aerelius and the iconography of Western and Oriental churches. Bible studies interrogate questions about the Peshitta’s authorship, also the Old Greek versions of Daniel. A new translation of Al-Qāsim ibn Ibrāhīm al-Rassī throws light on Christian-Muslim relations in the 9th century. Turning to modern times, several papers discuss the Christian communities of Iraq, as well as in-depth studies on Mandaic theology and ritual.

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ContributorBiography

EricaHunter

Dr. Erica C.D. Hunter is Affiliated Researcher, Faculty of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, University of Cambridge. She was Senior Lecturer in Eastern Christianity, Dept. of History, Religions and Philosophies, School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London until 2020. Her research interests focus on Syriac Christianity in Iraq and Syria, as well as the outreach of the Church of the East in the Caucasus, Iran, Central Asia, Afghanistan and China until 1500, with a particular interest in the Syriac material from Turfan. 

Table of Contents (v)
Foreword (vii)
Preface (ix)
Publications of Rifaat Y. Ebied (xi)

Do Pictures From the Past Repeat Themselves? [Martin Tamcke] (1)

The Ten Horned Ram of Old Greek Daniel 8 [Ian Young] (13)

A ʻGiftʼ in Syriac: a Mosaic from Osrhoene [John Healey and Claudia Gioia] (29)

Al-Qāsim ibn Ibrāhīm al-Rassī and Christian-Muslim Relations in the Ninth Century [David Thomas] (61)

Discovering ‘Paradise’ at Turfan [Erica C.D. Hunter] (73)

Post-Chalcedonian Conflicts in Egypt: On the Historical Context and Orthodoxy of Timothy Aelurus (457–477 C.E.) [Dietmar W. Winkler] (87)

The Ceremonial Creation of the Body of Adam in Alma Rišaia Rba [Sandra van Rompaey] (101)

Daniel of Ṣalaḥ’s Introduction to the Psalms, Chapter 1-16: Timeless Essentials for Students of the Psalter [Jacob Thekemparabil and Daniel L. Mcconaughy] (137)

The Collective Authorship of the Peshitta New Testament [Terry C. Falla] (151)

Ephrem (allegedly) on Himself: Two Syriac Poems [Sebastian P. Brock] (215)

Eukhitism and Anonymity in the ʻBook of Stepsʼ [Brian E. Colless] (229)

Mana and Dualism in the Mandaean Tripartite System: with special reference to the esoteric text, Diwan-Qadaha-Rba-D-Dmuth-Kušṭa [Brikha H.S. Nasoraia] (249)

Auffassung und Darstellung der Trinität in der Ikonographie [Jean-Paul Deschler] (277)

Patriarchal Bone Relics in the Syrian Orthodox Dayr-al-Za’faran in Mardin (Turkey) [Amir Harrak] (293)

Peter of Kallinikos and the Syriac Language in the Late Sixth Century First Notes [Lucas Van Rompay] (311)

Marco Spurio?: Marco Polo on the Church of the East in China [Samuel N.C. Lieu] (329)

Daniel of Mardin: The Man and His Work [Simon L. R. Burke] (361)

Synodality in the Church of the East [Herman G.B. Teule] (385)

Glossary of Mandaean Terms (397)
Names of Mandaean Celestial and Darkworld Beings (401)
Contributors (405)

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