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In the Anglican Communion, the medieval practice, which certainly had some earlier roots, continued—that ordination came to any one individual in this 'sequence': deacon, presbyter, bishop. The Anglican ordinal was so committed to this pattern at the Reformation that Cranmer's text prayed that deacons 'may so well use themselves in this inferior office, that they may be found worthy to be called unto higher ministries in thy Church.' Latterly, however, Anglicans have not only sought to develop the calling of a deacon in his or her own right, but have in some places and cases promoted the idea that the true calling of a deacon and of a presbyter would be best clarified by a separate 'direct' ordination. John Gibaut, a liturgical theologian of the Anglican Church of Canada, presents the case for 'direct' ordination—rooting it in the patristic era, and spelling out its implications in the present day.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-60724-404-2
  • *
Publication Status: In Print
Publication Date: Oct 6,2009
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 43
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-60724-404-2
$138.00
Your price: $96.60

In the Anglican Communion, the medieval practice, which certainly had some earlier roots, continued—that ordination came to any one individual in this 'sequence': deacon, presbyter, bishop. The Anglican ordinal was so committed to this pattern at the Reformation that Cranmer's text prayed that deacons 'may so well use themselves in this inferior office, that they may be found worthy to be called unto higher ministries in thy Church,' and the rubric said they were to be told they must behave themselves as deacons for a year before proceeding. Latterly, however, Anglicans have not only sought to develop the calling of a deacon in his or her own right, but have in some places and cases promoted the idea that the true calling of a deacon and of a presbyter would be best clarified by a separate 'direct' ordination to the particular order instead of the present 'sequential' pattern, which makes those who believe themselves called to the presbyterate first of all state that they believe themselves called to be deacons. John Gibaut, a liturgical theologian of the Anglican Church of Canada, presents the case for 'direct' ordination—rooting it in the patristic era, and spelling out its implications in the present day.

In the Anglican Communion, the medieval practice, which certainly had some earlier roots, continued—that ordination came to any one individual in this 'sequence': deacon, presbyter, bishop. The Anglican ordinal was so committed to this pattern at the Reformation that Cranmer's text prayed that deacons 'may so well use themselves in this inferior office, that they may be found worthy to be called unto higher ministries in thy Church,' and the rubric said they were to be told they must behave themselves as deacons for a year before proceeding. Latterly, however, Anglicans have not only sought to develop the calling of a deacon in his or her own right, but have in some places and cases promoted the idea that the true calling of a deacon and of a presbyter would be best clarified by a separate 'direct' ordination to the particular order instead of the present 'sequential' pattern, which makes those who believe themselves called to the presbyterate first of all state that they believe themselves called to be deacons. John Gibaut, a liturgical theologian of the Anglican Church of Canada, presents the case for 'direct' ordination—rooting it in the patristic era, and spelling out its implications in the present day.

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Contributor

John St. H. Gibaut

  • Contents (page 5)
  • Introduction (page 6)
  • 1 The Pre-Nicene Period (page 10)
  • 2 The Post-Nicene Period (page 20)
  • 3 The Medieval Period (page 26)
  • 4 The Reformation (page 32)
  • 5 The Modern Period (page 36)
  • 6 The Restoration of the Diaconate (page 38)
  • 7 Conclusion (page 43)