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Sumerian Hymns from Cuneiform Texts in the British Museum


Transliteration, Translation and Commentary


Vanderburgh’s noted study of the Sumerian hymns to Bel, Sin, Adad, and Tammuz in the British Museum is an excellent example of one of the early attempts to grapple with the difficulties of the Sumerian language. Each hymn is presented in transliteration and translation, and these are accompanied by the author’s own commentary.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-59333-624-0
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Series: Analecta Gorgiana 30
Publication Date: Aug 20,2007
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 100
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-59333-624-0
$53.00

Sumerian is perhaps the most difficult of cuneiform languages and it has long been a source of fascination for scholars and laity alike. This examination of Sumerian hymns from the British Museum was one of the early attempts to grapple with the difficulties of the language. Limiting his study to the hymns contained in the collection of the British Museum at that time, Vanderburgh provided a transliteration, translation, and commentary of four important documents – hymns to Bel, Sin, Adad, and Tammuz, respectively. Since these deities were known in the world of the Hebrew Bible, finding independent information on them sheds light on the biblical world as well.

Frederick Augustus Vanderburgh (1847-1923) was a clergyman who earned his Ph.D. and taught at Columbia University.

Sumerian is perhaps the most difficult of cuneiform languages and it has long been a source of fascination for scholars and laity alike. This examination of Sumerian hymns from the British Museum was one of the early attempts to grapple with the difficulties of the language. Limiting his study to the hymns contained in the collection of the British Museum at that time, Vanderburgh provided a transliteration, translation, and commentary of four important documents – hymns to Bel, Sin, Adad, and Tammuz, respectively. Since these deities were known in the world of the Hebrew Bible, finding independent information on them sheds light on the biblical world as well.

Frederick Augustus Vanderburgh (1847-1923) was a clergyman who earned his Ph.D. and taught at Columbia University.

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Frederick Vanderburgh