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The author reviews a pamphlet that criticizes the connection between church and state in England. He attacks the bias inherent in the system, the inefficiency of it, and its inability to fulfill its churchly duties.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-61143-170-4
  • *
Publication Status: In Print
Series: Analecta Gorgiana 792
Publication Date: Aug 7,2010
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 28
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-61143-170-4
$36.00
Your price: $25.20

The article reviews a pamphlet that addresses the connection between church and state in England. The author admits all countries apart from America have united church and state. There is precedence for England’s actions. Nevertheless, the author says it is an imperfect system. Civil government needs separation. The English king becomes, essentially, England’s Pope. The connection of church and state means the state has authority over church matters. In this way, the author says the church of Scotland is far superior. The author recounts the details of England’s integration of the church into civil government. Clergy are given many civil exemptions. Other church offices are described. The Act of Uniformity damages religious liberty by forcing belief in the Church of England. The author describes the dissent towards the act. Even today some laws against Dissenters exist. The author asserts the Church of England would not collapse if it separated from state. The author provides a quotation on the injustices of the English system as well as its damage to the Episcopal Church. The English Church is also sectarian, bigoted and undisciplined. It consequently does not fulfill its religious duties.

The article reviews a pamphlet that addresses the connection between church and state in England. The author admits all countries apart from America have united church and state. There is precedence for England’s actions. Nevertheless, the author says it is an imperfect system. Civil government needs separation. The English king becomes, essentially, England’s Pope. The connection of church and state means the state has authority over church matters. In this way, the author says the church of Scotland is far superior. The author recounts the details of England’s integration of the church into civil government. Clergy are given many civil exemptions. Other church offices are described. The Act of Uniformity damages religious liberty by forcing belief in the Church of England. The author describes the dissent towards the act. Even today some laws against Dissenters exist. The author asserts the Church of England would not collapse if it separated from state. The author provides a quotation on the injustices of the English system as well as its damage to the Episcopal Church. The English Church is also sectarian, bigoted and undisciplined. It consequently does not fulfill its religious duties.

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  • ART. VII.-The Church Establishment of England (page 5)