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The Diatessaron of Tatian

Samuel Hemphill provides an English translation of the reconstructed text of The Diatessaron using the Arabic translation and Ephrem’s commentary.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-61143-357-9
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Publication Status: In Print
Publication Date: May 27,2011
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 8.25 x 10.75
Page Count: 114
Languages: English
ISBN: 978-1-61143-357-9
$117.00
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The Diatessaron has long intrigued scholars of New Testament and early Christianity because of its unique place in Gospel translations, its role in the spread of Christianity within the Syriac speaking world, and the fact that the Syriac text of this very influential text no longer survives in any known extant manuscript. The text does survive in later translations, most notably in Arabic, but the best source for the Syriac text is the Commentary on the Diatessaron written by Ephrem the Syrian in the fourth century. In the present work, Samuel Hemphill uses these two sources to produce an English translation of the text of the Diatessaron to the extent that it can be reconstructed. Hemphill includes a helpful introduction to Tatian and Diatessaron studies and also provides several appendices with more information on various topics pertaining to Diatessaron studies.

The Diatessaron has long intrigued scholars of New Testament and early Christianity because of its unique place in Gospel translations, its role in the spread of Christianity within the Syriac speaking world, and the fact that the Syriac text of this very influential text no longer survives in any known extant manuscript. The text does survive in later translations, most notably in Arabic, but the best source for the Syriac text is the Commentary on the Diatessaron written by Ephrem the Syrian in the fourth century. In the present work, Samuel Hemphill uses these two sources to produce an English translation of the text of the Diatessaron to the extent that it can be reconstructed. Hemphill includes a helpful introduction to Tatian and Diatessaron studies and also provides several appendices with more information on various topics pertaining to Diatessaron studies.

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SamuelHemphill

  • Copywrite Page (page 4)
  • TO MY FATHER, ROBERT HEMPHILL., (page 5)
  • PREFACE (page 6)
  • CONTENTS (page 9)
  • INTRODUCTION I. THE MAN TATIAN (page 11)
  • II. THE DIATESSARON IN THE EARLY CHURCH (page 14)
  • III. THE RECOVERY OF THE DIATESSARON (page 24)
  • TATIAN'S GOSPEL DIATESSARON (page 37)
  • A LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS (page 38)
  • APPENDIX A. (page 89)
  • APPENDIX B. (page 91)
  • APPENDIX C. (page 99)
  • TABLE OF CONTENTS OF THE EPITOME OF LUSCINIUS.¹ (page 101)
  • APPENDIX D. (page 106)
  • APPENDIX E. (page 110)
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