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Three miniscule gospel codices held by the General Theological Seminary in New York are published in partial facsimile form, along with thorough collations and descriptions. Codices Gregory 669, 2324, and 2346 are included.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 1-59333-463-X
  • *
Publication Status: In Print
Publication Date: Nov 1,2006
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 96
ISBN: 1-59333-463-X
$108.00

Three valuable gospel codices held by the General Theological Seminary in New York are now available to the wider academic world. The Hoffman Manuscript (Gregory 2324), Codex Gregory 2346, and the Benton Manuscript (Gregory 669) appear in partial facsimile with thorough collations and descriptions. These important documents are all of the miniscule class of ancient gospels. For ease of reference, this publication remains the primary edition.

Charles Carroll Edmunds was an Episcopal priest who served many parishes in New York and New Jersey from the late nineteenth century through the early years of the twentieth. He was honored with the degree D.D. for his distinguished service.

William Henry Paine Hatch was educated at Harvard and at the General Theological Seminary. He became a priest of the Episcopal Church and later earned a doctorate also at Harvard University.

Three valuable gospel codices held by the General Theological Seminary in New York are now available to the wider academic world. The Hoffman Manuscript (Gregory 2324), Codex Gregory 2346, and the Benton Manuscript (Gregory 669) appear in partial facsimile with thorough collations and descriptions. These important documents are all of the miniscule class of ancient gospels. For ease of reference, this publication remains the primary edition.

Charles Carroll Edmunds was an Episcopal priest who served many parishes in New York and New Jersey from the late nineteenth century through the early years of the twentieth. He was honored with the degree D.D. for his distinguished service.

William Henry Paine Hatch was educated at Harvard and at the General Theological Seminary. He became a priest of the Episcopal Church and later earned a doctorate also at Harvard University.

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Charles Edmunds

William Hatch

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