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Prof. Wheeler traces the development of the Latin imperfect from its earliest roots to its later simplification.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-60724-627-5
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Publication Status: In Print

Series: Analecta Gorgiana 378
Publication Date: Sep 23,2009
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 29
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-60724-627-5
$36.00

Arthur Wheeler was a professor of Latin at Princeton whose best known work on Catullus was published posthumously, after he died of a sudden illness in 1932. This early essay shows his more technical side as he defines and differentiates the various uses of the imperfect indicative, traces their interrelations, and outlines the history of the tense in early Latin. Since Latin tenses often fail to map well onto English, such essays are of great assistance in clarifying the possible meanings of verbs in this often problematic tense. Students of Latin, and of prose-composition in particular – will find this helpful, and those with an interest in the evolution of Latin will appreciate Wheeler's thoroughness.

Arthur Wheeler was a professor of Latin at Princeton whose best known work on Catullus was published posthumously, after he died of a sudden illness in 1932. This early essay shows his more technical side as he defines and differentiates the various uses of the imperfect indicative, traces their interrelations, and outlines the history of the tense in early Latin. Since Latin tenses often fail to map well onto English, such essays are of great assistance in clarifying the possible meanings of verbs in this often problematic tense. Students of Latin, and of prose-composition in particular – will find this helpful, and those with an interest in the evolution of Latin will appreciate Wheeler's thoroughness.

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Contributor

Arthur Leslie Wheeler

  • III - THE IMPERFECT INDICATIVE IN EARLY LATIN: I INTRODUCTORY (page 5)