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The Scholastic Culture of the Babylonian Talmud studies how and in what cultural context the Talmud began to take shape in the scholastic centers of rabbinic Babylonia. Bickart tracks the use of the term tistayem ("let it be promulgated") and its analogs, in contexts ranging from Amoraic disciple circles to Geonic texts, and in comparison with literatures of Syriac-speaking Christians. The study demonstrates increasing academization during the talmudic period, and supports a gradual model of the Talmud's redaction.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-4632-0657-4
  • *
Publication Status: Forthcoming
Publication Date: Jul 31,2022
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 263
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-4632-0657-4
$115.00
Your price: $80.50

The Scholastic Culture of the Babylonian Talmud studies how and in what cultural context the Talmud began to take shape in the scholastic centers of rabbinic Babylonia. Bickart tracks the use of the term tistayem ("let it be promulgated") and its analogs, in contexts ranging from Amoraic disciple circles to Geonic texts, and in comparison with literatures of Syriac-speaking Christians. The study demonstrates increasing academization during the talmudic period, and supports a gradual model of the Talmud's redaction.

The Scholastic Culture of the Babylonian Talmud studies how and in what cultural context the Talmud began to take shape in the scholastic centers of rabbinic Babylonia. Bickart tracks the use of the term tistayem ("let it be promulgated") and its analogs, in contexts ranging from Amoraic disciple circles to Geonic texts, and in comparison with literatures of Syriac-speaking Christians. The study demonstrates increasing academization during the talmudic period, and supports a gradual model of the Talmud's redaction.

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ContributorBiography

Noah Bickart

Noah Benjamin Bickart holds the Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel Chair in Jewish Studies in the department of Theology and Religious Studies at John Carroll University.

Acknowledgements (ix)
Introduction (1)
   The Siyyuma and the Anonymous Voice of the Talmud (11)
   Structure (20)
Chapter One. Exiled to the Academy (25)
Chapter Two. The Origins of Redaction (53)
   Megilla 14b (54)
   Pessachim 88a (62)
   Avodah Zara 16b (65)
Chapter Three. The Terminology of the Siyyuma (77)
   The Study of Talmudic Terminology (79)
   The Semitic Root s.y.m. (88)
   Conclusions (152)
Chapter Four. Late Uses of the Root s.y.m. in the Talmud and benei siyyuma in Geonic Literature (155)
   bBava Kama 117a-b (156)
   bBava Batra 22a (158)
   bSanhedrin 14a (170)
   Halachot Gedolot #43 (180)
Chapter Five. Linguistic Parallels = Cultural Parallels (183)
   Moses as Scholastic Model in Both Traditions (192)
   The School of Nisibis (198)
   Letter of Simeon of Beth Arsham Concerning Barsawma (199)
   The Cause of the Establishment of the Session of the Schools (200)
   Examples of the Root ܡ.ܝ.ܣ in The Cause (206)
   Conclusion (210)
Conclusion (213)
Select Bibliography (223)
Indices (243)
   Index of Biblical and Rabbinic Citations (243)
   General Index (247)